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One of the struggles that most global workers face is sending their young adult child “back” to the U.S. for college or another path into adulthood. For many of these students, America is a foreign country since they spent most of their lives overseas. Let us share a story of how GRC enabled one family to thrive through this challenge.

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Trey (name changed for confidentiality) grew up in South America, where his family has served for years and continues to serve today. Trey was accustomed to homeschooling in a culture without time pressure and deadlines. He is a social and athletic young man. After a couple of years of college in the U.S., Trey became very discouraged as he was failing out of school, struggled with living independently, and became disillusioned with American culture in some areas. He was without direction, wanted to drop out of school, and wanted to escape the expectations of having to be “successful” in American culture. He had no plans for his future, and his parents were concerned about him. Trey is not abnormal for many kids of global workers that grow up overseas and try to integrate into American college without having been “trained” on how to “succeed” in this environment. Many global workers leave the field for this very scenario, sometimes never to return to their place of service.

Trey was able to spend a semester working with a GRC counselor addressing his personal struggles, preparing for this culture, and identifying a realistic future path for him. He was able to do this without his parents having to return to the U.S. from their field and service for an extended period of time, which is what we see happen quite often. After his time at GRC, Trey has returned to college with an action plan to succeed, a major chosen, and some careers to explore. Additionally, he is now able to be assertive and show initiative in taking responsibility for his choices, which shows a great deal of maturity on his part. His parents are pleased with his progress during this semester, which has allowed them to continue in their place of service without additional worry and concern for him being so far away.